FAQ

What is WUW?
WUW is a 501c3 nonprofit network of independent businesses, organizations, and individuals who process urban trees and/or advocate for the trees’ highest uses under the WUW brand.
Where do WUW products come from?
All products that carry the WUW brand have been made from public or private trees that would otherwise be chipped, turned to firewood, or landfilled.
Will WUW cut down my tree and pay me for the wood?
  • Tree owners must pay for the removal of their trees. The difficult and dangerous work of tree removal is costly and should be done by a certified and bonded arborist. WUW arborists will be happy to consult with you about your tree and remove it if necessary.
  • It is unlikely that a sawmill will pay for your “wood” or your log. Your tree only becomes wood after the sawyer saws it into lumber. Making lumber includes transporting the log, sawing, stacking, drying and handling by sawmill staff, plus related business expenses.  As you can see, the cost of turning a tree to wood is quite a job.
  • We don’t harvest trees for their timber value. We only remove and/or use trees that are compromised by insect, disease, natural decline, or unavoidable circumstances.
What is the “highest use” for my tree?
  • If your tree is healthy, we hope it stays that way! Trees provide essential benefits when they are growing healthy and strong. Among other things, they filter our air and water, reduce the effect of summer temperatures on homes and urban environments, provide critical ecological habitat, and store up to 48 pounds of carbon per tree per year [NC State University].
  • If your tree is not healthy, our condolences! The next best thing it can do is live on in locally made wood products that can last for generations to come.
Can I donate my tree?

You must first pay for the removal of your tree. Your WUW arborist will know if your tree is a good candidate for further uses. If it is, she or he will contact a WUW sawmill to take the log for processing. If you are not using a WUW arborist, please provide information about your tree here.When possible, we will match you with a local sawmill to work with the arborist you’ve chosen. Tree owners are an important link in the process of salvaging urban trees. About 30% of urban tree removals are suitable for sawing into lumber.

I’m removing my tree myself, will you buy the log from me?
Where can I buy products made with WUW?
Where can I buy WUW lumber, slabs or specialty cuts of wood?
Does WUW include reclaimed lumber, barn wood, or reclaimed wood?

We think of reclaimed lumber as wood from “the other urban forest.” Reclaimed lumber is useable wood—including architectural pieces, beams, boards and more—that is removed from old buildings before they are demolished for one reason or another. Reclaimed wood comes in as many forms as wood can take. Search “reclaimed wood” in our search bar for WUW businesses offering reclaimed wood.

My tree was hit by lightning; can you make usable lumber from it?

Find out! Tell us about your tree on our Tree Inquiry Form or ask your WUW Arborist if your tree is a good candidate for further uses. If so, ask him or her to contact a WUW Sawmill to take the log for processing.  See also “Will WUW cut down my tree and pay me for the wood?”

Will you work in my community?

We’d love to. We help create local networks so that communities can retain their trees as a local resource.  Please contact us at info@wisconsinurbanwood.org to tell us a little more about what you have in mind.

What does the “urban” in Wisconsin Urban Wood mean?

“Urban” means, “where people live.” Private individuals, who own everything from small city lots to large woodland areas with a single dwelling, manage the majority of Wisconsin trees.  Whether you own a single tree, or many, we are interested in helping you find the highest uses for your trees.

How does one join the Wisconsin Urban Wood partnership?

If you are an arborist, sawyer, kiln operator, wood worker, organizational leader, or an individual interested in being part of WUW’s stewardship of urban forests, we’d love hear from you. Please introduce yourself to us.